Greener Pastures

 

My early years at home were preoccupied with explorations deep in the forest, fostering a direct relationship to the land that give me so much.

 
Growing up immersed in a flourishing bird sanctuary on the west coast, having the ability to harvest my own food from the gardened terrain, my early years at home were preoccupied with explorations deep in the forest, fostering a direct relationship to the land that give me so much. However now, after relocating to the sprawls of city life, I find myself obligated to a constant quest for ties to that land buried miles beneath marble and concrete, towering above the struggling trees peppered throughout public parks. Following this bumpy transition to a small space without a back yard, I looked curiously towards the four-foot balcony hanging lifeless and barren from my building, imagining it’s quick conversion to my greener second living room, a space to create and nourish a bond with an outside living, even within the city.

Back on the west coast with a full acre of fertile land to tend to, I had it easy, with plenty of space to plan and grow anything my heart could desire, yet here in Montreal spring has sprung, and my heart desires a beautiful garden surrounding a patch of grass to sit and have a coffee in the morning, or possibly if I can find the room, a few flowers and veggies to brighten the barren balcony. But as most who live in the city know, it’s hard to get full light all day, living up atop the north side of a giant brick reaching for the clouds itself.

I decided on strong plants that could find the light themselves, a species that could thrive in second hand light of the city. I also laid down a nice solid box from corner to corner with fine grey stone for drainage and a solid topcoat of soil to plant my new grass couch.
I even spared enough wall space to create a descending line of vegetable wall planters, allowing for the nutrients from one to fall into the next, simple ways to invest in green nutrition, green comfort and green nostalgia, helping to feel once again at home in nature.
 
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About the author

Obsessive collector and sculptor of things, Shantz lives and bleeds for those moments of collaboration.

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