Scandinavian spa and design

 

Summer is long gone and we are well into autumn, but there are still a few outdoor activities we can enjoy and it doesn't mean there's no time to relax.

 
Summer is long gone and we are well into autumn, but there are still a few outdoor activities we can enjoy and it doesn't mean there's no time to relax.

Go outside, soak up the sun, listen to water lap against the shoreline and relax —all great ways to recharge your batteries, be one with nature and enjoy all the benefits that come with it. Out of all cultures, Scandinavians best understood these rituals, particularly by making saunas a worldwide phenomenon.

Scandinavia is an Arctic region of unparalleled natural beauty, rich in unique landscapes. Both majestic and hostile, this area conceals geothermal wonders like geysers, hot springs straight from the ground, thermal pools and mud pools.

Nordic culture has managed to use these natural marvels for therapeutic purposes. Their curative principles, now well known in North America, have been adapted to our geography and climate.

Scandinavian spas have been associated with a particular design movement that originated in the 1930s. It uses natural material, such as wood, leather and hemp, which extends our relationship with nature and replicates, in a more or less abstract way, the curved shore of a lake, the bark of a tree and other plant life.

It's remarkable to see members of a culture shaped by a climate so unforgiving able to integrate its constraints in every aspect of their lives, both in leisure and design.

Why not do the same and fully enjoy nature and our climate? There's nothing nicer than spending more time outdoors and integrating nature into the decor of your home.
 
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About the author

Caroline Larocque began her career as a kitchen designer right after she completed her studies.

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